• Overcoming Picky Easters

    Picky Eating is the common term for what Picky Eaters do. These children are hard to please and to feed in general, but they rarely end up starving themselves. Patterns of “over-selecting” food are common among children with developmental disorders, but they are also common among all children. Estimates vary widely among studies, but in a recent report, the estimate was about one-fifth of all children. Children with developmental complications often have real issues with the sensory textures and flavors of food or they have had trouble chewing or swallowing and unpleasant experiences with food, therefore, they tend to be less flexible when it comes to things in general, and less flexible than most when it comes…

  • Improving Sleep in an Autistic Child

    Finding the right combination of tools, strategies, and routines will take some trial and error. As you trial sleep tools and make changes to routines and environments, be sure to keep a sleep log or sleep journal. Subtle changes can have drastic effects on your child’s behavior, so keep track of your observations by writing it down. Consider jotting down diet changes, bedtime adjustments, the frequency of wake-ups, wake-up times, and behaviors completing the bedtime routine. Even small changes can add up to a big difference over time and it’s too easy to lose sight of your efforts without the written log. 1) MELATONIN FOR AUTISM SLEEP ISSUES  Some doctors and…

  • Helping Your Child Cope With A Move

    There’s a reason moving is considered one of the top five most stressful situations in life, right up there with divorce, job loss, major illness, and the death of a loved one. It’s no secret why. In addition to being a major hassle, it disrupts your life in ways that push even the most organized, experienced adults to their mental and physical limits. For a child, coping with the stress of moving is even more difficult. Even if they don’t have to change schools, even if there is no co-occurring trauma like divorce, and also if they’ve been through it before, a child’s still-developing brain is not well-equipped for the challenge of relocating their…

  • 20 Tips to Keeping Your Child Safe

    Many individuals with Autism and other special needs might not be aware of the numerous potential dangers that exist in our homes. That is why we, as parents of kids with special needs, often need to be extra vigilant when it comes to household safety, remembering that “child-proofing” our homes is sometimes necessary for our adult offspring as well as our young children. Here are 20 tips that can help you keep your child or someone else with special needs safe while he or she is in your home. 1. Hidden gas shut-off valves You never know when your child might start playing with the controls on your gas stove,…

  • Banishing The Babysitting Blues

    Parenting children with AS can be a joyous, rewarding and eye-opening experience. It can also be challenging, and at times exhausting. We all need breaks in our parenting hours to rest, refuel, and regenerate ourselves. For most families, that means hiring a babysitter—but where do you find one, and how can you help to ensure that the experience will go well? Here are a few thoughts. Where to look? Some younger children may be able to be cared for by a responsible local teen, especially one who might be an older sibling of a special needs child. Ask friends, neighbors, or church or temple members for recommendations. You might ask…

  • Dr. Trevana Moore on Melatonin

    Dr. Trevena Moore as she discusses the use of melatonin in children with autism Follow the link below to see the KCTV5 newscast: https://na01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.kctv5.com%2Fmore-parents-are-giving-kids-melatonin-to-sleep%2Fvideo_59d8d405-6646-538a-a3e5-69388a5236f5.html&data=02%7C01%7Clhpowell%40ku.edu%7C5e62fdfac32642a4dfbb08d67b03cf2f%7C3c176536afe643f5b96636feabbe3c1a%7C0%7C0%7C636831653616941421&sdata=lmjqFtAZpvXKYwOQF02h0rqTlecGDnT2IWShAKgmmqc%3D&reserved=0